News from the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Tall Fescue Plant CAES News
Fescue Fungus
While many people know that the microbes in our guts are an important part of our health, many are unaware that microbes are just as important to our crops.
Andre da Silva is the new Extension vegetable specialist on the UGA Tifton campus. CAES News
Extension Vegetable Specialist
New University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva will improve vegetable production in Georgia through irrigation — and fertilizer-based research on the UGA Tifton campus.
Palmer amaranth can reach heights of up to 7-10 feet. CAES News
Palmer Amaranth Management
Georgia farmers scored what many view as a significant victory when the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency extended the registration of the controversial weed killer dicamba for two years. The herbicide can be used for over-the-top weed control in cotton and soybean fields, according to Stanley Culpepper, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension weed specialist.
Agricultural policy expert Robert Paarlberg, center left, and Dean Sam Pardue of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, center, congratulate the winners of the 2018 D.W. Brooks Faculty Awards for Excellence including, from left, Professor Yen-Con Hung, Associate Professor Kari Turner, Professor Dan Suiter, Senior Public Service Associate Lisa Jordan, and Professor Qingguo “Jack” Huang. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Lecture
Whether it’s an argument for slow food or technologically advanced agriculture, most people oversimplify the narratives surrounding the modern food system.
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well. CAES News
Fruit Shape
From elongated tubes to near-perfect spheres, vegetables come in almost every size and shape. But what differentiates a fingerling potato from a russet or a Roma tomato from a beefsteak? Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of some of our favorite fruits, vegetables and grains.
University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Alumni Association President Van McCall, left, and University of Georgia President Jere Morehead congratulate former President of the United States Jimmy Carter after his induction into the Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame November 9 at UGA. CAES News
President Jimmy Carter
He’s easily the most famous peanut farmer in history, and he is now the first president of the United States to be inducted into the Georgia Agricultural Hall of Fame. 
Damage from Hurricane Michael in Tift County that impacted a pecan orchard. CAES News
Hurricane Michael Impact
To avoid losing their farms following Hurricane Michael, Georgia farmers need financial relief as soon as possible, according to Jeff Dorfman, a professor and agricultural economist in the University of Georgia Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
Pecans lie on the ground beneath 20-year-old pecan trees that were uprooted when Hurricane Michael blew through Decatur County, Georgia. CAES News
Pecan Prices
Despite a low supply of Georgia-grown pecans, Georgia producers are faced with lower prices for what remains of the pecan crop after Hurricane Michael. 
The CAES Alumni Association will present the 2018 awards at a banquet on November 9 at the Grand Hall in Tate Student Center. CAES News
Alumni Awards
Agricultural advocates and educators topped this year’s list of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Alumni Association’s best and brightest alumni.
David Okello, the head of the groundnut improvement program for Uganda’s National Agricultural Research Organisation (far left) hosted colleagues from other East African nations who are working to streamline their groundnut breeding programs through a breeding management software program and the Peanut Innovation Lab. Project participants include (from left): Justus Chintu of the Department of Agricultural Research Services in Malawi; Amade Muitia from the Mozambique Agricultural Research Institute (IIAM); Tonike Malema from Zambia; Mary Jacinta de Carvalho from Mozambique; Lutangu Makweti of the Zambia Agricultural Research Institute; Owiny Ronald  from Uganda; and Sinkala Willard from Zambia. Photo by David Okello CAES News
Breeding Peanut Varieties
Groundnut producers face challenges in the field, from unpredictable rainfall to acidic soils to a particularly difficult menace, groundnut rosette disease. These types of challenges are the reason that plant breeders systematically create new varieties, targeting the genetic traits that carry resistance or improve yield. A project funded by the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut is equipping plant breeders from across East and Southern Africa with innovative software to make that work quicker and more efficient.